Chasing the Green Fairy Chapter 2 Sneak Peek & Giveaway

Friday, February 28, 2014

 
Today, I am treating readers to a special sneak peek of Chapter 2 of Chasing the Green Fairy, Book II of The Airship Racing Chronicles, releasing March 4th, 2014.
 
 
Chapter 2

I rapped on the door of Phineas’ home, a well-appointed townhouse situated just off Hyde Park, clacking the brass bumblebee door clacker loudly. I waited for what felt like an eternity. On both sides of Phin’s townhouse, the neighboring residences had arched foyers. The vista gave me vertigo. I was about to bang again when the butler, but not Phin’s usual man, opened the door.

“Yes?” the man asked, looking me over from head to toe.

“Yes? I’m here to see Phineas.”

“Master Shaw is not in.”

“Yeah, that’s a lie. Tell him Lily is here.”

The man frowned then closed the door. I sighed and waited. The butler returned several minutes later.

“My apologies, Miss Stargazer. Mr. Shaw had indicated he was not permitting guests, but he said I may let you in. He is in the conservatory,” the butler said. “You may see yourself back.”

“What’s your name?”

“Kent.”

“Kent. Nice to meet you. In the future . . . well, Phin always sees me.”

“So he indicated. I do wish he’d said so before,” the man said with an exasperated expression. “Pleased to meet you, Miss Stargazer.”

“Call me Lily,” I said with a smile then headed toward the back.

Phineas’ house was a hodgepodge of the odd and unusual. You could barely blaze a path through the ornate sculptures, carved masks, tinkered contraptions, tables crowded with jars of god-only-knew-what, and a copious amount of plants. Now and then, you even had to duck a bird flitting past. I stopped to look at a locked box with a human skull on its lid. Shaking my head, I wound my way back. The glass-roofed conservatory, situated at the center of Phin’s odd little house, allowed him to grow his herbals in private. And there, amongst all the wildly growing plants, I found Phineas, shirtless, pouring a bubbling yellow liquid into a copper pot.

“Have a seat, Lily. Almost done,” he said.

I looked around. There were no chairs anywhere, but I spotted a large tribal drum. I sat on it and watched him work.

“What’s brewing?” I asked as I eyed Phineas over. He looked paler than usual. His face looked drawn, and though it was rather cool, he was sweating profusely. His auburn-colored hair, wet with sweat, stuck to his head, and he’d grown a moustache since the last time I saw him.

“I think I’ve finally got a good extraction of refined opium,” he said. “A tinker at the market made me a device to spin the tinctures, to separate them at a higher velocity than ever before. I’m getting much more refined products now.”

Phineas and I had once shared a passion for opium. For me, it had been a passion of habit, a way to dull the pain. For him, it was a passion of science. Phineas had an eye for detail, understanding a puzzle down to its very roots. While nothing escaped him, he put much of his mental energy toward herbals. Sometimes he was after medicine. Sometimes he was after pleasure. As I watched him work, I tried not to think about smoking opium. But it was impossible. Around me, beds of opium flowers were in full bloom. Heaps of the dried herbs littered a nearby table. I was ashamed of the craving it caused.

“There,” he said, stirring the pot. “We’ll know in an hour. Too bad you aren’t in the habit anymore. We could try it together.”

“You look like you could use a break. And a nap. And a meal.”

Phineas shrugged. He mopped off his forehead and wiped down his armpits and chest. His skin was pasty, and he looked like he’d lost weight. His pants were hanging low on his waist. I tried not to notice the dark hair trailing down from his bellybutton below his belt. I looked away as he pulled on his shirt. I wondered if I used to look like him, a bit eaten up, when I’d let my habit get the best of me. “Tea?” he asked.

“Sure.”

Phin motioned for me to follow him to his small kitchen at the back of the house. After clanging around in the cupboards for several minutes, he retrieved a teapot. It took him two tries, but he finally filled it with water and set it to heat. “So . . . what brings you by?” he asked, flopping into a chair across from me.

“Someone tampered with the Stargazer.”

“Tampered?”

“Removed one of our modified devices. Sabotaged the ship.”

Phineas got up and looked in his cupboards again. “I don’t have any sugar.”

“That’s fine.”

Phin’s hands shook as he prepared the tea. The china clattered.

“Sit down,” I said then got up and started preparing the cups.

“A woman’s hand is sweeter anyway,” Phineas said then sat again. “The Stargazer . . . that’s awful,” he said, picking a tobacco pipe up off the table. “I’ll come by tomorrow and have a look, start talking to people. Surely someone saw something. I’ll get to work.”

“Don’t forget,” I warned. Phineas was great at sorting out details when he was himself. Right now, however, he was seeing the stars.

“Forget what?” he joked.

I grinned and shook my head. I went back into his cupboards for another look around. Inside, I found a jar of jam. There was a box of biscuits on the counter. I spread the jam thereon and set the plate down in front of Phineas. “Eat.”

He began munching immediately. “Oh! I nearly forget something,” he said, his mouth full. “I followed up on your inquiry about that man, Temenos, the one the Venetian tracked down. I found the same information her people did. It appears this Dorian Temenos died in Portugal.”

In the heat of the quest for Aphrodite, I had tried to shake off the news that my father was dead. Upon return to London, however, the mystery haunted me. I’d asked Phin to contact Celeste’s order. They were pleased to help me and passed on all their information to Phineas. “How did he die?” I asked. I set down the tea, again joining him at the table.

“I’ve got a record of him arriving in Lisbon then his death record about six months later. No other details.”

“Oh,” was all I could think to say. I took a sip of tea. The news left me unsatisfied. “Nothing else about him?”

“Not yet. No family records. No work records. I can travel to Lisbon if you want.”

I shook my head. Something told me it was time to leave well enough alone. “No, that’s okay.”

“I’ll be passing through Southwark later this week. I’ll inquire about the grave you’d asked about—the woman at the debtor’s prison. You still want me to do that?”

I nodded then set the cup down. I pressed my fingertips against my forehead. My head had started to ache.

“You all right, Lil? You want me to bring you something mild?”

Yes, I did. “No, I can’t.” I opened my eyes and looked inside my cup. The tea leaves had fallen into the shape of the triskelion, the symbol painted on the balloon of the Stargazer.

“Don’t let this bit with the Stargazer rattle you. You might love that ship, but to others, it’s just a beautiful thing they want a piece of. They don’t care about it the way you do.”

I smiled at Phin and set my hand on his.

He squeezed my fingers. His hazel eyes twinkled. I knew the look all too well. More than once, Phineas and I had enjoyed too much herbal and woke up in bed together. “You still with the Italian?” he asked slyly.

“Yes,” I said, patted his hand, then let him go. “Regardless, you are in serious need of a bath, and I don’t like that moustache.”

Phineas laughed. “I thought it made me look gentlemanly,” he said, stroking the moustache. “You know, I’ve been wondering. Why, out of all of us, was old Salvatore the one to win you away from Byron? What made him so special?”

I grinned at him. “Get some rest and don’t forget to come by the Stargazer tomorrow.” I rose to leave.

“All right, Lily,” he said with a laugh. He followed me to the door.

Outside, thunder rumbled. I grabbed my hat, adjusted my lily pin to ensure it was securely fastened, tossed it on, and headed outside.

“And shave off that moustache,” I called to Phineas who was leaning against the door frame smoking his pipe. Grinning, he bowed ever-so-elegantly then went inside.

I walked away thinking about Phin’s question. I’d never really seen what had happened between Sal, Byron, and me like that. In the end, I still cared deeply for Byron. I just wanted something more, something different . . . with Sal.

 Giveaway Time!


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A quick dispatch of awesome . . .

Just wanted to share a quick dispatch with everyone about some great things that happened this week. First, my friend and fellow steampunk writer Jacqueline Garlick (check out her awesome book Lumiere) pointed out to me that Chasing the Star Garden placed in the Top 10 Steampunk Books of 2013 in the Preditors and Editors Reader Poll! How did I miss that? Who cares! How cool is that?

http://www.critters.org/predpoll/final_tally_novelsteam.ht

And something happened that is pretty awe-some. All writers struggle with self-doubt, and I never thought I would see this day. Check out this goodness. While I know the list "stickness" won't last, pictures are worth a thousand (or 65,000) words.



 
Amazon was even nice enough to give me the little flag:
 
 
 
I've been writing since I was a kid and, in the past, had more shoe boxes full of rejection notices than a person needs or deserves (I totally trashed them, btw, in a fit of "moving on" energy). I spent years and years failing as a writer until one day I just gave up. More than a decade later, I tried again . . . and would you look at that. Never give up on your dreams.
 
Hugs and many thanks . . .

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SteamU: Dieselpunk 101 with Karen Kincy

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Today at SteamU, I am pleased to welcome author Karen Kincy. SteamU Professor Kincy is the author the deiselpunk novel Shadows of Asphodel. Professor Kincy is giving us a freshman lecture on deiselpunk. If you are a fan of steampunk, take notes. Deiselpunk is governed by its own rules, and while it shares many commonalities with Steampunk, there are several unique features we should notice. Welcome, once again, to author Karen Kincy . . .



 
Today’s Lecture by SteamU Professor: Karen Kincy
Author of: Shadows of Asphodel
 
Further Discourses Available:
Office Hours:

Dieselpunk 101

by Karen Kincy
                                                                                                                

When you think of steampunk, what time period do you imagine? What country? What city?

Many of us would imagine Victorian England, particularly London. We might find our corseted heroine sipping tea aboard an airship, high above the steampowered smog, when a dastardly villain launches his clockwork flying monkeys from the Thames.

Or you, like me, might find Victorians a bit mundane. You might be inclined to travel—even travel through time. You say goodbye to Queen Victoria and hello to King Edward.

I’m fascinated by the time of King Edward’s reign, from 1901 to 1910, though the Edwardian Era often includes a few years after his death. Though that is, of course, an Anglocentric term. In France, for instance, arts and innovation flourished in La Belle Époque. This beautiful era lasted until the Great War.

As an author, where and when did I decide to go? Well, I had been researching the differences between steampunk and dieselpunk. Some said it was a simple matter of steam power vs. diesel power. Others said steampunk focused on Victorian aesthetics and technology, while dieselpunk explored the art deco militaristic feel of the World Wars.

Then a question occurred to me. Dieselpunk was named after Diesel. Rudolf Diesel, to be exact, the German engineer and inventor of the diesel engine. When was Diesel alive?

I hit the books and discovered Diesel was born in 1858, and died September 29, 1913 under mysterious circumstances. Diesel boarded the steamer Dresden on his way to England for a business meeting, but after he ate dinner and retired to his cabin for the night, he was never seen from again.

This, I thought, would make a damn good plot twist. Especially if Diesel didn’t die, but went on to build new inventions in an alternate history.

So I set my story in 1913. A bit early for dieselpunk, at first glance, but surely a book with Rudolf Diesel himself qualifies.

Steampunk, dieselpunk, atompunk. Each of these genres evokes the atmosphere of a particular slice of history. And each author takes this history and tinkers with it until it becomes slightly or wholly alternate.

(Granted, I tend to be strict with my own research and deviations from reality. Don’t get me started about rigid airships that ignore real zeppelins, which were immeasurably more awesome than anything fictional.)

I’m currently working on the sequel to my dieselpunk, and I’m researching all sorts of fascinating things about zeppelins, Prussia, and Nikola Tesla. That’s my recipe for dieselpunk… with the addition of some secret ingredients.

About the Author:

Karen Kincy (Redmond, Washington) can be found lurking in her writing cave, though sunshine will lure her outside. When not writing, she stays busy gardening, tinkering with aquariums, or running just one more mile. Karen has a BA in Linguistics and Literature from The Evergreen State College.
Karen is currently launching a Kickstarter campaign for the second novel in her series, Storms of Lazarus. A donation to her project earn you anything from an ebook to a character named after you! Truly, a worthy campaign. Stop by Kickstarter and check out her project!
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Chasing the Star Garden is on Tour!

All this week Chasing the Star Garden is on tour with Fabulosity Reads! All 4 and 5 star reviews thus far! Hooray!

http://fabulosityreadsbookpromotions.blogspot.com/

I wanted to share the lovely book trailer Wendy, my tour director, created for the novel. Enjoy!





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RBTL Presents: Cover Reveal for Journey of the Princess of Ice

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

 
 
Title: Journey of the Princess of Ice
Author: LaVerne Thompson
Series: The Elementals 
Genre: New Adult/ Fantasy/ Graphic Novel
Publisher: Isisindc Publishing, LLC
Release Date: TBA 
Blurb/Synopsis: 


What happens when fire meets ice?

Ice had traveled the realms for centuries searching for the ice elementals, others of her kind but she was alone always alone. Never staying one place for long because sooner or later her mere presence caused the temperature of the land to drop to a killing freeze. Until she found the one place her powers had no effect. And perhaps the one being who could counter her freeze.
Running from a destiny not of his own choosing, Arch finally found the one person who could make him stop running. But Ice must never learn the truth. A fire demon destroyed her world and he was his father’s son.


LaVerne Thompson is the mother of two college age kids, so weird to read that. A wife, a former intellectual property attorney, a multi-published best-selling author of contemporary, fantasy, and sci/fi sensual romances and avid reader of same. She also writes romantic suspense and new adult contemporary under Ursula Sinclair.

Her stories are available from Amazon, All Romance E-books, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Smashwords as well as her publishers. Visit her at http://lavernethompson.com to learn more.

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Steampunk Hands Around the World: Tidioute, PA

Sunday, February 23, 2014


Image by Ray Dean. Stop by her page for more Steampunk Hands Around the World: www.raydean.net

Steampunk Hands Around the World

Welcome to the Oil Region 


For my Steampunk Hands Around the World stop, I bring you steam’s “nail in the coffin." Welcome to the Oil Region and the birth of fossil fuel technology.

Oil Drilling Near Tidioute, PA 1800s

I was raised in northwestern Pennsylvania in a small town named Tidioute where petroleum was first discovered. Our neighboring village, Titusville, is always credited with the first successful petroleum dig, but it was in Tidioute where the first well was dug—the oilmen just missed the vein of oil by two feet. Regardless, Tidioute, PA became an important city in the petroleum revolution.

Hunter Mansion, Tidioute PA

While now just a quaint village along the Allegheny River, the 1800s version of Tidioute, PA would serve as a wonderful backdrop for a steampunk story. Though Tidioute now boasts a population of barely over 1000 people, it was once a mecca of oil and culture. 

Tidioute, PA Overlook
 In the 1800s, with a population of about 30,000 people, Tidioute, PA was flush with money. Early timber fortunes secured Tidioute families lavish Victorian and Italiante style homes, such as the impressive Hunter Mansion built by timber baron Jahu Hunter,  that line Main Street to this day. A hot spot along the rails, Tidioute once even boasted the ornate, 3-story Grandin Opera House. Famous troupes and performers would travel directly from New York City to Tidioute, PA to bring culture to a town now most famous for its annual fishing tournament. Even the troupe performing during the event of Abraham Lincoln’s assignation is noted for taking the stage at the Grandin Opera House.

Grandin Opera House Piano


What a perfect setting for a steampunk tale. With giants like Rockefeller kicking around chasing the liquid gold teeming just under the surface of the oil region, one can imagine crafty time-traveling protagonists engineering the demise of the oil industry before its inception. 

Learn more about Tidioute, PA here: Tidioute.com



Want more Steampunk Hands Around the World? Stop by author Ray Dean's blog to check out more of the festivities!


http://www.raydean.net/
 

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Chasing the Green Fairy, Chapter 1 Sneak Peek & Giveaway

Friday, February 21, 2014


Today, please enjoy a sneak peek at the first chapter of Chasing the Green Fairy, The Airship Racing Chronicles Book II, releasing March 4th!

Chapter 1:
A chartreuse-colored leaf fluttered down onto the wheel of the Stargazer. It was early morning. The mist covering the surface of the Thames reflected the rosy sunrise. Yawning, I reached out to brush it away only find it was not a leaf at all. Carefully, I balanced the fragile creature on the tip of my finger.

“Mornin’, Lil. Hey, what’s that?” Jessup called as he bounced onto the deck of the Stargazer.

Angus was cursing as he cranked out the repair platform below the ship. We were preparing for our morning practice run to Edinburgh.

“A luna moth,” I replied.

“I thought maybe you’d finally caught the green fairy,” Jessup joked as he climbed into the burner basket.

I grinned. The moth’s green wings, dotted with yellowish eyes, wagged slowly up and down. It was beautiful, but it was dying. “My mother once told me that they are fey things, that they live in the other realm until it’s their time to die. Then, they come to humans.”

“Why?” Jessup asked as he adjusted the valves. Orange flame sparked to life.

“She said that even enchanted things want to be truly loved at least once.”

“Don’t we all?” he replied with a laugh.

A harsh wind blew across the Thames, clearing the morning mist. It snatched the delicate creature from my hands. I tried to catch it, but the breeze pulled it from me even as it was dying. I lost it to the wind.

I sighed heavily as I picked up my tools then bounded over the side of the ship to the repair platform. I pulled out a dolly and rolled under, joining Angus who had fallen remarkably silent. The moment I saw the gear assembly on the Stargazer, I understood why.

“What the hell?” I whispered.

“Aye, lassie.”

“Jessup!” I shouted. “Get the tower guards down here!”

“What’s wrong?” Jessup called.

“The Stargazer has been sabotaged!”

I stared at the mangled gears. From the saw marks on the gear assembly to the metal shrapnel blown around the galley, it was clear what had happened. I felt like someone had punched me in the gut.

Seconds later I heard Jessup’s boots hit the platform and the sound of him running toward the guard station.

“They removed Sal’s torque mechanism. Sawed the bloody thing right off,” Angus said angrily.

“But . . . who?” I stammered.

“The Dilettanti?” Angus offered as he strained to examine the rest of the assembly.

“No,” I said as I touched the saw marks. The rough metal cut my finger. “That business is finished. Byron saw to that.” I stuck my bloodied finger in my mouth. The salty taste of blood mixed with the tang of gear grease.

“Then who?”

“Someone who didn’t want us to race in the qualifying. Someone who wanted to learn what had us running so fast.”

We were less than a month out from the British qualifying. While there were other good race teams in the realm, no one raced better than us. After all, we were the champions of the 1823 World Grand Prix. My stunt in Paris had brought us heaps of acclaim, but not all our British competitors were impressed. Envy had set in.

“Grant?” Angus suggested.

Julius Grant, whose team was sponsored by Westminster Gas Light, was our greatest competition at home. He hated us. He was annoyed that we were sponsored by Byron, annoyed that I was female, and annoyed that we were faster than him. Grant was the most likely suspect. But he was not the only one. “Almost too obvious. What about Lord D?” I wondered aloud.

“He’d love to, but he doesn’t have the stones,” Angus replied. “Might be someone who doesn’t want us in the Prix. If they take us out during qualifying, we aren’t a threat abroad.”

“That means it could be anyone.”

“Hell, maybe one of Byron’s lovers took a stab at you.”

“But I’m not even romantically involved with him anymore.”

“The rest of the world doesn’t know that.”

I rolled out from under the ship. Leaning against the Stargazer, I wiped my hands. The cut stung as grease mingled with the open wound. I wanted to either beat someone to death or cry. I wasn’t sure which. Maybe both.

Angus joined me.

“Can we get it fixed in time?” I asked him.

He wiped sweat from his bald head as he thought. “It’ll be close. I’ll need Sal’s help.”

“You? Need Sal?”

“Aye, lassie.”

“He’s busy getting the factory ready, but he’ll come.”

Jessup returned with Edwin, the stationmaster, and Reggie, one of the guards.

“Where the hell were your people last night?” Angus demanded of Edwin. We’d known Edwin for a long time, and we trusted the guards in London. Something wasn’t right.

As Angus and Edwin discussed, a terrible ache rocked my stomach. I set my hand on the side of the Stargazer. Her honey-colored timbers shone in the sunlight. Just as sleek and beautiful as she was the first time I laid eyes on her, she was my pride and joy. My ship. My love. I closed my eyes and took a deep breath.

“What do you think, Lil?” Jessup asked.

Clearly, I’d missed something. “Pardon?”

“Edwin suggested we post a private guard,” Jessup explained.

I nodded. “We’ll sort it out.”

“Lily, I’m so sorry. Someone must have sneaked past us. I can’t believe it,” Edwin said. His clear blue eyes were brimming with tears.

I set my hand on his shoulder. “Who was stationed on this end last night?”

“Morton.”

I sighed. I wasn’t one to point fingers, but that explained it. “Was he still drunk when he went home this morning?” I asked Reggie.

Reggie shifted uncomfortably as Edwin turned to look at him. “He was,” Reggie answered after a moment.

“That lazy, rummy bloke. I’ll kill him! I’ll kill him!” Edwin shouted, and in an angry huff, stomped back down the platform.

“Sorry, Lily. Angus. Jessup. I won’t take my eyes off her,” Reggie said sadly then went to take a post near the Stargazer.

“We’ll sleep on the ship until we get a guard on board,” I told Angus and Jessup who nodded in agreement.

“A guard . . . but who can we trust?” Jessup asked.

“The Stargazer is family. We need family to keep her safe,” Angus replied then looked at me.

“You mean . . . Duncan?” About three years earlier, I’d been, albeit briefly, in a relationship with Angus’ older brother Duncan. While I’d fallen for Duncan the moment I’d laid eyes on him, we were not suited for one another. Back then, I wasn’t ready to give up Byron or anything else.

Angus shrugged. “I suppose he’s over you by now.”

“That’s all well and good,” Jessup spat, “but we need someone to look into this! Someone needs to be held accountable! We should send for the Bow Street boys.”

Angus shook his head. “Only if we want everyone in London to know.”

“Well, we need to do something!” Jessup protested.

“Let’s keep it quiet. I’ll talk to Phineas,” I replied.

Jessup nodded eagerly. “Yeah. Good idea.”

Angus frowned. “Are you sure about that?”

Phineas and I had a convoluted opiate history, but as Angus knew well, I’d been keeping my habits in check. “It’ll be fine. I’ll check in with Phin, go get Sal, and come back. We can head out to the league meeting together.”

“If Grant looks even a wee bit guilty, I’m going to squeeze his neck,” Angus cursed.

“If he looks guilty, I’ll help you,” I replied. I set my hand on the Stargazer. It was so painful to see something you loved damaged.

“It’ll be all right, Lil,” Jessup said trying to comfort me. “We’ll get her fixed.”

I smiled weakly at Jessup then turned to leave. I knew he was right, but it didn’t make me feel any better.
Giveaway Time!
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SteamU: Getting Your Steampunk Book on Audio by Jim Musgrave



Today SteamU welcomes author Jim Musgrave who shares his insights with fellow writers on how to get your steampunk book on audio. I don't know about you, but I'm all ears (haha, I know). Audio books are increasingly popular and there are several ways to get your book on audio. Jim is also the author of Steam City Pirates, an exciting new steampunk novel that I encourage everyone to ccheck out! Gather around students . . .

http://www.amazon.com/Steam-City-Pirates-Steampunk-Mysteries/dp/1493690957/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1392985020&sr=8-1&keywords=steam+city+pirates
 

Getting Your Steampunk Book on Audio


 
An audio book contains a recorded version of a print book. While audio books for the blind have existed for decades, the commercial audio book market blossomed with the advent of books on tape in the 1970s. If you have a great speaking voice and want to earn extra money, or if you're an author looking for another way to sell your product, here's how to make an audio book.
 
Locate the source material. Get permission from the book or article's owner to record it as an audio book. If you're recording your own work, make sure that you've copyrighted the original version and the sound recording.  Practice the material before recording. Get acquainted with the pacing and vocabulary of the piece. Try different accents and be certain of how to pronounce names or difficult words.  Modulate your voice. Avoid speaking in a monotone; change pitch and timbre to get your point across and keep the listener engaged. Don't speak in a rapidly changing "sing-song" voice, but let the material dictate your tone of voice.

Choose the best recording equipment you can afford. A simple mixing board will do. Check sites like Musicians Friend to find deals on four- or eight-channel mixers. Unless you expect to features lots of sound effects in your audio book, more channels aren't necessary. Invest in a good microphone, like a Shure or Telefunken. 

Hire an engineer and voice talent for more complicated projects. If the book in question needs more than one narrator, or if you need to record music and sound effects, consider hiring voice talent and an engineer. If you don't have time to do so on your own, find an audio book producer to package your book for you. 

Decide which product format you want to sell. CDs and digital downloads (MP3s) have replaced cassette tapes as the format of choice. Then figure out where to sell your audio book. You may want to use your own website, or sell it through a site like Audible.  I used ACX, Amazon’s audio platform.  In this site you can “recruit” possible voices for your book and “hire them” for the job based on their posted samples to you. 

For example, I needed somebody “Irish” to record my mystery, Forevermore, and I was able to hire Shandon Loring to read my book.  He has an interesting voice; it is deep and resonant without being distracting to the ear, and I enjoyed his sense of drama while reading.  I hired him to share the proceeds of the sale of my book, 50/50, as I truly believe that the important job of reading my novel, and making it come to life, deserved a big share, and I also believe the “voice” can make or break the success of an audio book--especially a mystery. 

Therefore, you should choose your talent wisely when you decide to create an audio, and be ready to give them the chance they so richly deserve.  If my audio version of the first novel in my “Pat O’Malley Steampunk Mystery Series” is a success, I will owe it to my friend and business partner, Shandon Loring.
 
I wish you all the success in your own enterprise, and please drop me a line if you want to share your own experience making an audio recording! 

Thanks so much to Jim Musgrave for stopping by! Be sure to stop by the author's blog. He has a ton of interesting links, posts, images, and other steamy goodies!

Connect with the author:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/648293.Jim_Musgrave‎

Author's blog

Amazon

Pinterest

 
 
~Class Dismissed!

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SteamU Night Class: Cover Reveal! Chasing the Green Fairy

Friday, February 14, 2014


For our SteamU (late) night class, how about a special treat?

Let's have a cover reveal! Are you ready for Chasing the Green Fairy, Book II in The Airship Racing Chronicles? Let's (finally) have a look at the beautiful cover, shall we?



Novel Description:

A sabotaged airship.

A recovering opium addict.

A messenger with life-shattering news.


With the 1824 British airship qualifying race only weeks away, Lily Stargazer is at the top of her game. She’s racing like a pro, truly in love, and living clean. But on one ill-omened day, everything changes

Pulled head-long into the ancient secrets of the realm, Lily soon finds herself embroiled in Celtic mysteries and fairy lore. And she’s not quite sure how she got there, or even if she wants to be involved. But Lily soon finds herself chasing the spirit of the realm while putting her own ghosts to rest. And only accepting the truth--about her heart and her country--can save her.  


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20512114-chasing-the-green-fairy 

Chasing the Green Fairy Playlist

My musical tastes are a bit varied. I'm a bit stuck in the 90s, but every now and then a song gets under my skin for a section in my book and it just works--no matter how random! Here is my playlist for Chasing the Green Fairy.
Here is a link to an album that inspired much of this novel, Porcelain by Helen Jane Long:
This song was playing in the background during a very important scene in the novel:
Another song was PERFECT for a scene late in the book: Tabhair dom do Lámh 
Here are the lyrics:
Just give me your hand and I'll walk with you through the streets of our land, through the mountains so grand. If you give me your hand. Just give me your hand and come along with me. Will you give me your hand and the world it can see that we can be free in peace and harmony. From the north to the south. From the east to the west. Every mountain, every valley, every bush and bird's nest!
For the complete playlist, click here:

YouTube Playlist for Chasing the Green Fairy

 

Giveaway Time!

To celebrate the release of this beautiful cover and to get into swing for the novel release coming March 4th, let's have an ARC giveaway! Ten lucky readers will win an ARC of Chasing the Green Fairy (we can sub Chasing the Star Garden if you haven't started the series yet). Check out the rafflecopter below to enter:


a Rafflecopter giveaway

 Short and sweet, the novel trailer:



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